Bokamoso Education Trust | Bokamoso mentors shaping the future generation
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Bokamoso mentors shaping the future generation

15 Mar Bokamoso mentors shaping the future generation

[Feature image: Niko and mentee, Tokollo Mokoala]

We asked a few Bokamoso mentors about the role they play to their mentees and how the mentorship program has benefited these children? Read below on what they had to say:

Ryan Hackney, mentor to Brandon Dube

What is your role as a mentor to your Bokamoso child? To be there for Brandon on any level, I have reiterated to him that I am a “WhatsApp away” and will assist him with anything and if I can’t assist him we will work it out together.

Why is it important to you to play that role?
Although he has his mom and brother, I offer another level of support and interest. I can give a different a perspective to his family and by showing some interest in him, he knows he is not forgotten.

How do you think you and your mentee have benefited through this mentorship programme?
Brandon has gained more confidence. I have noticed his confidence grow and I was blown away by his speech at the Bokamoso year-end picnic. Through our conversations, I have had to divulge who my role models are and why. I had not done this since high school and it made me reassess myself.

 

 

Kelly Van Der Westhuijzen, mentor to Nthabiseng Malematja

What is your role as a mentor to your Bokamoso child?
To listen, to support, to guide and provide advice where necessary

Why is it important to you to play that role?
We are called to disciple back into all generations in the bible and I think it’s valuable to have a mentor in all walks and seasons of life. I wish I had one as a teen.

How do you think you and your mentee have benefited through this mentorship programme?
Being a sounding board for her and then for me I learnt plenty as I need to self reflect and often share my own experiences.

 

Michele Katz, mentor to Prizelle Mafuba

What is your role as a mentor to your Bokamoso child?
I see my role as primarily being a source of support for my mentee and a life coach, the essence of which is actually dictated by her and her needs. She is academically a strong child and so I do not believe that I can add much value to the content of her studies, but I think she gains the most benefit from being able to talk to me about her life (personal and school) and her future.

Why is it important to you to play that role? First and foremost – introduction. Without this charity and without this programme, I would never have crossed paths with Prizelle Mafuba, who I have become very attached to over the last four months.

How do you think you and your mentee have benefited through this mentorship programme?
I feel that Prizelle has benefited the most in having an adult give her one on one time weekly in a safe space where I can offer her my ear, sympathy, suggestions and practical tools to cope with the stressors she faces now as a senior school going young lady facing tertiary education and some life choices. It is my honour to transfer my knowledge of life, as well as employment practices and career advice, which is where my expertise lies, to someone who really appreciates it and take it seriously. This has been one of the most rewarding experiences of my life.

Sally Downie, mentor to Sally 

What is your role as a mentor to your Bokamoso child?
I love meeting with her each week – she is entering the rather tumultuous age of being nearly a teen but not quite – she is sensitive and caring but we talk a lot about being tougher and not allowing others to hurt her feelings.

Why is it important to you to play that role?
It helps to talk and to have someone listen to what you have to say. Sometimes when you say something out loud it becomes less scary and can practically work through solutions together.

How do you think you and your mentee have benefited through this mentorship programme?
I sometimes think I learn more than she does on some days. She loves drama and acting and although I think she would like to be a businesswoman, the stage may yet beckon!

I am not sure if Sally obtains any real wisdom, but I think the sessions allow her to chat with me about all sorts of things and this helps. Sometimes when you say something out loud it becomes less scary and can practically work through solutions together.

Mary-Jane, mentor to Gabi

What is your role as a mentor to your Gabi?

I feel that I play the role of a trusted big sister to Gabi. She does not open up very easily so I hope that as her mentor, she trusts me enough to open up and ask for guidance when she needs it or to appreciate my guidance even when she may not think she needs it.

Why is it important to you to play that role?

As she enters her first year of high school, I feel that it is important to help her navigate her way through the next few years so that she comes to understand the value of an education and invests enough of her time and energy into it so that she leaves with opportunities that will allow her to stand on her own two feet with pride and grace at her side. I hope to help her understand the opportunities ahead of her, that she may see that her goals are achievable.

How do you think you and Gabi have benefited through this mentorship programme?

With regards to how I have benefited from this process – It’s definitely not an easy task, I must admit. But each time I meet with Gabi, I walk away in absolute awe of her strength and determination. Now it’s just a matter of working out how to help her manifest those powers in a way that helps her to become her best self.

Niko Patrikios, mentor to Tokollo Mokoala

What is your role as a mentor to your Bokamoso child and why is it important to you to play that role?

As a mentor, I have a role to play in this development and building trust between us the critical grounding required to develop him into a responsible teenager and young adult.

How do you think you and your mentee have benefited through this mentorship programme?

It has been a very rewarding and enriching experience, slowly starting to get to know TK and build a friendship. He is a really good kid who has great potential, he does tend to struggle with focusing on what needs to be done and the importance of applying himself in order to achieve. There is a time to play and a time to work and I think gradually he is starting to understand this concept.

Bokamoso not only requires financial support, but you too can contribute to making a child’s dream a reality by offering support through mentorship to a child. Visit Bokamoso Education Trust website or contact Bokamoso CEO, Cathrine du Toit on cathrine@bokamosotrust.org.za to find  out what you can also do to help.

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